Holiday Safety Tips for Your Pets

Holiday Safety Tips for Your Pets

As the holiday season approaches and you prepare for the festivities please remember to keep pet safety in mind. 

Pets are part of our family and they too will be in the midst of all the celebrations.  Here are some simple safety tips to consider during this holiday season

Holiday Decor

Keep all ornaments, ribbons, garlands, tacks and potpourri out of reach. Avoid using tinsel.  Cats love to play with tinsel and often ingest it. 

Don’t leave your pet alone in a room where they have access to decorations.  Anything ingested can potentially cause an intestinal obstruction or may be toxic.  

Yummy Foods

Don’t change your pet’s diet.  Any change in diet can result in diarrhea.  Foods high in fat can trigger pancreatitis so avoid those fatty meat scraps.

Do not feed bones to pets, this can result in some serious gastrointestinal emergencies.  Feed only the safe foods and treats that your pets are used to eating.

Secure the garbage can.  Move foods out of reach on counter tops and tables. 

Make sure your pet does not have access to foods intended for people.  Many things are toxic to pets that may seem harmless such as:
chocolate, any food containing xylitol (artificial sweetener), macadamia nuts, grapes or raisins, onions, alcoholic beverages.  

Plants

Plants can add beauty to our homes and are very decorative but many plants are toxic if ingested.  Keep all plants out of reach. 

Check out the ASPCA toxic and non toxic plant list at www.aspca.org

Warmth and Light

All of the things used to keep our gathering spaces warm can pose a danger to pets and people.  Block off fireplaces with appropriate safety barriers. 

Avoid using candles where pets can reach them.  Keep all electric cords out of reach or secured to prevent access by curious pets. 

They may try to chew on the cords resulting in electric shock or burns and if ingested may require surgical care.

Safe Haven

All the noise and activity may be stressful for pets.  Consider setting up a safe, quiet area in your home away from the holiday bustle. 

With visitors coming and going pets are more likely to slip out.  

Identification and Vaccinations

Collars and identification tags should have current contact information.  Because collars can be lost if your
pet escapes or more commonly not put back on a
pet especially after a bath, microchips are very important. 

Microchips are a permanent form of identification.  Many veterinarians, animal control officers and animal shelters have
microchip scanners and will scan found pets in hopes of reuniting a lost pet with an owner.  Microchips are an inexpensive ticket home for a lost pet. 

Make sure your pets are up to date on their vaccinations.  Never leave pets alone that are not accustomed to being together.

PriorityVet wishes your family and pets a safe and happy holiday season!

 

 

Content Courtesy of Dr. Laurie Pearlman and The New Jersey Veterinary Blog